The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers. Rudyard Kipling.
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers
The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers

The Irish Guards in the Great War. Edited and compiled from their Diaries and Papers

Garden City: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1923. First Edition. Hardcover. TEMPORARILY DISCOUNTED. WAS $625. A SCARCE copy of the first American edition, first printing, of this regimental history and official account of the Irish Guards in the First World War, written by Rudyard Kipling in honour of his son, John, who served as a Second Lieutenant in the Irish Guards. This book also contains a listing of the battle rolls of honour and casualty lists of all officers and men who served with the First and Second Battalion. Each of the two volumes is in Fine condition. The jacket for Volume 1 is in about Very Good condition with chips and tears as well as some tape repairs to the verso. The jacket for Volume 2 is in Very Good + to Near Fine condition and shows some general wear and a tiny hole to the spine panel. John went missing in action (perhaps, if not likely, was killed) in his first action at the battle of Loos in September, 1915. As John's body was never found, the cause of his death has not been determined. For quite some time, his Grave's location was not known. The highly Patriotic Rudyard Kipling loathed the Germans and wrote a number of Propaganda pieces in support of the British in the War. His son's death intensified his negative view of the Germans, and he derived the work using his own knowledge as well as the point of view of the British battalions determined by him though his utilizing the diaries of the Regiment's diaries as well as their private letters and documents, thus providing the work with a strong foundation. Also notable is that Cyril Falls, in his work "War Books, stated: "One could be assured that when Mr. Kipling turned his hand to a regimental history the result would be very different to the ordinary. The particular invention wherewith he has enriched this book is a sort of chorus--the comment of the private soldier upon the events narrated, which is witty and effective. Mr. Kipling has also brought to bear his magic upon that most matter-of-fact of records, the battalion war diary, and has made it live. He has composed a noble tribute to the great regiment in the ranks of which he lost his son." The Royalties due Kipling for the work were instead sent to charity established for soldiers' widows. Rudyard Kipling was keen imperialist and patriot who wrote propaganda on behalf of the British government. He encouraged his son to join the Army and to thus fight in the war. He earnestly sought to get his son a commission, but the lad, who was but 16 years of age when the war began, was rejected by the Royal Navy due to his severe shortsightedness. He was also initially rejected by the army for the same reason. After reports of the Rape of Belgium and the sinking of the RMS Lusitania in 1915, Rudyard Kipling came to see the war as a crusade for civilization against barbarism, and was even more keen that his son should see active service. Rudyard Kipling sought to have his friend, Frederick Roberts, the 1st Earl Roberts (himself a former Commander-in-Chief of the British Army and Colonel of the Irish Guards) to use his connections to get John Kipling enlisted, resulting in John's being commissioned as a Second Lieutenant into the 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards on 15 August 1914, at just under 17 years of age. After he completed his training, John Kipling was sent to France in August along with the rest of the battalion, which was part of the 2nd Guards Brigade of the Guards Division. Notably, the great author was already there on a visit due to his serving as a war correspondent. When John went missing in he action at Loos, his parents searched for him in field hospitals and interviewed comrades to try to determine what had happened. On October 7, 1915 a notice in The Times confirmed that that was "wounded and missing". Not only was John missing, but the location of this grave, if any, remained unknown for more than 50 years after his disappearance. Ultimately, Kipling's grave was identified by Military Historian, Norm Christie, then Records Officer of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission in 1992, and now he is officially listed as buried in St Mary's ADS Cemetery in Haisnes. Further research by Graham Parker and Joanna Legg demonstrated that Christie's identification of the grave was correct and a spokesman for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission stated that "[it] welcomed the latest research which supports the identification of the grave of John Kipling". In our experience, copies of the first American edition in the dust jackets are scarcer than are those in the first UK edition, making this a rather nice find for the collector. Fine / Varied condition. Item #3121

Price: $265.00

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