Item #3523 The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]. Anthony Trollope.
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]
The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]

The Warden, TOGETHER WITH Barchester Towers [the RARE 1859 Editions]

London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1859. RARE EARLY EDITIONS. Hardcover. A Very Good or better copy of "The Warden" TOGETHER WITH a Very Good or better copy of "Barchester Towers", being the 1859 Edition of each novel, each being set in Barchester, with The Warden being Trollope's fourth novel -- the first of Trollope's novels to receive a positive reception by literary critics, and the pair being the first two novels in Trollope's famed Barsetshire Chronicles. "The Warden" is centered on an institution called Hiram's Hospital which houses a dozen old men. The institution was created by a 15th Century Foundation attached to Barchester Cathedral over which the Bishop presides. The Foundation provided for a specified income to be paid to each of the Hospital's residents from the revenue generated by the Foundation's real estate, with the balance to be paid to the Warden for his service. The Warden, Septimus Harding, and his widowed daughter live nearby and, as the Centuries passed, the real property values had increased greatly as had the consequent balance paid as income to the Warden, thereby providing him with a significant income. A young suitor of the Warden's daughter became convinced that the Foundation's financial affairs were being mismanaged, demanded a public accounting, and brought a suit to revise the relevant financial arrangements. His cause was adopted by The Jupiter, a newspaper, and therein loudly proclaimed, bringing great consternation to some members of the Barsetshire clergy, particularly to Archdeacon Grantly. Of The Warden, Walpole stated: "The Warden is essential to every lover of Trollope because it is in these pages that he meets for the first time two of the great figures in English fiction, Mr. Harding and Archdeacon Grantly." Of "The Warden", Henry James wrote: "Trollope had no time to give his tale a classic roundness, yet there is (in spite of an extraordinary defect) something of that quality in the thing that first revealed him. The Warden was published in 1855, it made a great impression, and when, in 1857, Barchester Towers followed it, every one saw that English literature had a novelist the more.... Trollope had lived long enough in the world to learn a good deal about it; and his maturity of feeling and evidently large knowledge of English life were for much in the effect by the two clerical tales. It was easy to see that he would take up room. What he had picked up, to begin with, was a comprehensive various impression of the Clergy of the Church of England and the manners and feelings that prevail in cathedral towns. This, for a while, was his specialty, and, as always happens in such cases, the public was disposed to prescribe to him that path. He knew about bishops, prebendaries, precentors, and about their wives and daughters. He knew what these dignitaries say to each other when they are collected together, aloof from secular ears. He even knew what sort of talk goes on between a bishop and a bishop's lady when the august couple are shrouded in the privacy of the episcopal bedroom. This knowledge, somehow, was rare and precious. No one had, as of yet, been bold enough to snatch the illuminating torch from the very summit of the altar..... There is no ecclesiastical figure ... so good as the first creation of this sort so happy as the admirable Mr. Harding. The Warden is a delightful tale, and a signal instance of Trollope's habit of offering us the spectacle of a character. A motive more delicate, more slender, as well as more charming, could scarcely be conceived. It is simply the history of an old man's conscience....The Subject of The Warden, exactly viewed is the opposition of the two natures of Archdeacon Grantly and Mr. Harding, and there is nothing finer in all Trollope than the vividness with which this opposition is presented....we remember, while it was still something of a novelty, to have heard a judicious critic that it had much of the charm of The Vicar of Wakefield." The Warden is a stand-alone work and can be read as such, but it also serves as a prologue to Trollope's next novel, "Barchester Towers", a work centered on the death of the old Bishop and the arrival of the new one (Bishop Proudie) and his wife, a pair who had a dramatically different effect on on the Cathedral Town than that had by the Old Bishop and his favored and most influential clerical colleagues. Of it, Trollope stated: In the writing of Barchester Towers I took great delight. The Bishop and Mrs. Proudie were very real to me, as were also the troubles of the archdeacon and the loves of Mr. Slope." Of this novel, Walpole stated: "It is not...his greatest... nevertheless it remains as perhaps the type of novel of all the Trollope family. It is the one book of them all that you would give to someone who said to you, 'Now what is Trollope really like? What is the point about Trollope?' This book introduces and exults over one of the greatest figures in the Barsetshire Chronicles - Mrs. Proudie.... The theme, slender as it is, is one eternally attractive - the theme of the bitter bit, the bully bullied, the war between tyrants....." As to "Barchester Towers", Henry James further writes: "I would speak in some detail of Barchester Towers if this did not seem to commit me to the prodigious task of appreciating each of Trollope's works in succession.... There came a moment in his vigorous career...when I renounced the effort to 'keep up' with him.... Before that, I had been punctual, devoted; and the memories of the earlier period are delightful. It reached, if I remember correctly, to about the publication of 'He Knew He Was Right', after which, to my recollection (oddly enough, too, for that novel was good enough to encourage a continuation of past favours, as the shopkeepers say), the picture becomes dimmed and blurred....." James goes on to praise Trollope's "The Last Chronicle of Barset" as "one of his most powerful things". He notes that "Trollope was familiar with all sorts and conditions of men, with the business of life, with affairs, with the great world of sport, with every component part of the ancient fabric of English society..... He was for many years concerned in the management of the Post-Office; and we can imagine no experience for fitted to impress a man with the diversity of human relations." [Seeking the Dear Reader's pardon of this intrusion, this description's author declares that he went to the campus bookstore in Charlottesville, Virginia to find a book of which he had never heard by an author of whom he had heard absolutely nothing and selected Trollope's "Barchester Towers" from the shelves. He fell in love with Trollope's work, has been ever-constant in that love for the past 45 years, remains so even this very day, and is convinced that he will feel that way until he departs this planet. He encourages the dear reader to join him in reading Trollope's works.] Each of these books is at least EXTRAORDINARILY SCARCE AND LIKE LIKELY RARE. WE HAVE NOT SEEN ANY OTHER COPY OF EITHER OF THEM in 45 years of our diligent search for Trollope rarities. In that context, we note that the pink cloth of each copy's binding has faded, the volumes show soiling and signs of use, the boards of The Warden show a few a wrinkles in the cloth and each hinge (internal) is cracked/broken. There is wear to each volume's spine and each volume shows wear to the spine ends and leading board corners. ALTOGETHER, THIS IS A RARE AND NOTABLE PAIR OF EARLY COPIES OF HIGHLY NOTABLE EARLY TROLLOPE WORKS. Very good or better / very good. Item #3523

Price: $1,650.00

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