To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]. Jack London, Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, Theodore Roosevelt, Homer Greene.
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]
To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]

To Build a Fire [by Jack London, True First Appearance]; The Wood-Choppers [by Kate Chopin, True First Appearance]; The Night Express [by Willa Cather, True First Appearance]; The New Citizen [by Theodore Roosevelt]; and Pickett's Gap [by Homer Greene]

Boston: Perry Mason Company, 1902. First Edition, First Printing. Wrappers - Newspaper format. A Very Good set of this 6-month run of The Youth's Companion, complete with the May 29, 1902 issue containing Jack London's short story "To Build a Fire". This, the 1902 version, is the first appearance of this famous short story about an inexperienced and overconfident young miner who ventures alone into the Yukon to find gold, but unwisely chooses to do so in extremely cold weather. The story was initially written and published for a young audience and thus was published in The Youth's Companion. London later revised the tale for a more mature audience and this revised version was first published in a 1908 edition of The Century Magazine and became his best-known and most anthologized short story. In the original, 1902, version of this tale of a man in the remote, snow-covered woods, there is no dog with him, he survives his winter ordeal, and, although he emerges injured, he has nevertheless survived the danger and comes to a greater understanding of nature's impersonal and unsympathetic operation -- thus emerging somewhat harmed but also wiser. However, in the 1908 version the weather is considerably colder, a dog was with the man, the fire was extinguished by snow which fell upon it from a tree bough, and the protagonist dies. The same issue of The Youth's Companion also contains the first appearance of Kate Chopin's short story "The Wood-Choppers", the June 26, 1902 issue contains the first appearance of Willa Cather's poem "The Night Express", the February 20, 1902 issue contains "The New Citizen / By Theodore Roosevelt / Now President of the United States", and the set contains the entire serialization of "Pickett's Gap" by Homer Greene. Of course, works by many other authors also appear in this long run of the magazine. Each issue has a horizontal center fold and the issues show scattered toning, marking, and some evidence of use, varied wear to the spine folds, and, with the exception of two issues, each issue of the entire run is in Very Good or better condition. [The May 15, 1902 issue has a tear across a bit less that one-half to the center horizontal fold, and the June 12 issue is mostly separated at the outermost spine fold and shows some tearing and loss to that page and to the following one.] Each issue bears a stamp of Harry E. Packard, showing the issues all to have been in the same ownership. The 1908 version was later included in London's 1910 collection of short stories "Lost Face" and thus is available there as well as in The Century Magazine. However, we can find no publication of the 1902 version in any of Jack London book's issued during his life, making the May 29, 1902 issue of The Youth's Companion the sole lifetime source of the story in its original form. Surviving copies of the tale that was the genesis of, and provided the basis for, what became Jack London's most famous and most anthologized short story still in its original newspaper format are quite scarce, and such long runs of the magazine containing the famous tale in their original state are scarcer still. QUITE SCARCE INDEED. Very good. Item #843

Price: $600.00