The Loss of El Dorado: A History. V. S. Naipaul, Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul.
The Loss of El Dorado: A History
The Loss of El Dorado: A History

The Loss of El Dorado: A History

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1970. First Edition, First Printing. Hardcover. An unusually Fine copy of the first edition, first printing, in a Fine dust jacket, with the topstain remaining particularly rich and vibrant; V. S. Naipaul's third nonfiction book, a narrative history of Naipaul's native Trinidad. Interestingly, the book, while being researched and written by Naipaul, was scheduled for publication by Little, Brown and Company. However, in 1966, Little, Brown had requested that Naipaul produce a book on Port-of-Spain. Little, Brown, not pleased with the work Naipaul produced, determined not to publish it. However, Knopf then agreed to publish the work in the United States and André Deutsch in the UK. The book received critical acclaim, with noted translator Gregory Rabassa, writing in the New York Times stating: "As the uprising of black-power dissidents against he government of Eric Williams takes place and puzzles outsiders, this deeply foreboding book on the early years of Trinidad -- under the Spanish during the 16th and 17th centuries and the British at the start of the 19th -- becomes all the more revealing. It is history as literature, meticulously researched and masterfully written, as in the manner of Thucydides. So often has the story of the lands of the southern Americas been the enhancement of myth in the name of national glory, that V. S. Naipaul's chronicle is most welcome as a block against sliding back into shallow fantasy." Rabassa, as he concludes his comments, also states: "A Trinidadian of Indian ancestry who has published six novels and two earlier works of nonfiction, Mr. Naipaul has not only given us a lesson in history, he has shown us how it is best written." However, not completely satisfied with what he had produced, Naipaul later reworked some of to book's material into a later work titled "A Way in the World" in which he rendered part of his historical narrative as fiction. Naipaul won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Literature "for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories." In presenting the Prize to Naipaul, the Swedish Academy particularly noted "The Loss of El Dorado", pointing out that in the book, "...after extensive archival consultations, he [Naipaul] traces the terrible colonial history of Trinidad. He feels bound to stick to the authenticity of details and testimonies, choosing to reject pure fabulation, while working to give historical matter a literary dimension." An unusually Fine copy. Fine / fine. Item #851

Price: $100.00

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