Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX. Frederic Shoberl, ron, Barry Cornwall, James Montgomery, John Galt, Hofland Mrs., W. H. Harrison, Miss Mitford, Mrs. C. Baron Wilson, Bowditch Mrs., Miss L. E. Landon, Henry Neele, Ettrick Shepherd, many others.
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX
Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX

Forget Me Not for 1830; A Christmas and New Year's Present for MDCCCXXX

London: R. Ackermann, 1830. First Edition, First Printing. Hardcover. A RARE FINE COPY of this diminutive and famous Annual in a Very Good + to Near Fine example of the original and complete slipcase / box, both of which are in surprisingly nice condition compared to other copies that we have seen, complete with 14 Plates. All edges of the closed page block are in gilt. The book shows some general light edge wear, particularly where the boards join the spine, a bit of rubbing to the spine panel, and some other general signs of use. The leading corners of each board show tiny rubs but remain remarkably sharp. The hinges are in absolutely wonderful condition. The pages and plates are surprisingly bright, and there is a small private library stamp on the title page and on the final page. The page marker ribbon is lacking and its stub remains at the rear pastedown. The box has the book's short title and date written on one edge, which edge also has a small piece of tape affixed to it with what we presume to be a library note written on the tape. While the box also shows some general wear -- particularly to the side from which it presumably would have been pulled from the shelf, it remains a remarkable survival. The Forget Me Not books are notoriously fragile and prone to wear and loss. Often, the bottom of the box is missing, and in some cases the box has been lost or discarded upon the rebinding of the book in sturdier material or otherwise. A well-known British publisher specializing in engravings, Rudolph Ackermann was a significant force in encouraging and promoting painting and engraving in England. He published the first "Forget Me Not (Forget-Me-Not) in 1822, employing Frederic Shoberl as its editor, making it the first literary annual to be published in England. His series proved quite popular, and by 1828 fifteen different "literary annuals" were published in the UK. This 1830 Forget Me Not thus is one of the earliest annuals in the series and thus is one of the earliest Literary Annuals ever to be published in the UK. The volume contains a frontispiece and 13 additional plates, each tissue-guarded, and the elegantly-embossed presentation plate is in quite nice condition. (The tissue guards have produced some offsetting to the pages, as would be expected.) In short, and notwithstanding its flaws -- which are quite modest when compared to other copies in this series, this is a wonderful example of a very early English Annual which, when in a condition as nice as is this copy and in the complete box, is EXCEEDINGLY SCARCE INDEED. Of additional interest is this comment from the Sydney and New South Advertiser for January 16, 1830 (which includes a comment on each plate but has some errors in their numbering): "ACKERMANNS FORGET ME NOT FOR 1830 On this, the fifteenth day of the new year, we sit down to acknowledge a new year's gift from the Antipodes! A book published for 1830 in the Strand, London, at this moment glitters upon our table in George-street, Sydney! This is a celerity of movement which the Muse of Pope might have had in her eye, when it was "in a fine fit of frenzy rolling" and she might have intended her blessing for Mr. ACKERMANN, who thus magically " Speeds the soft intercourse from soul to soul, And wafts a [book] from [London] to the pole." These " Annuals" are a new constellation in the literary firmament ; their brilliancy is every year more and more dazzling, and, as they are " Forever singing as they shine," they sweetly realise the poet's dream of " The music of the sphere " They speak with" the voice of the charmer," warbling forth such exquisite Arcadian strains,—so various, yet blended in so faultless a harmony,—that it seems as though the etherial nine had descended from the Parnassian hill, to welcome the new-born year in a chorus of their mingled songs. According to the diversity of tastes, will be the diversity of suffrages in deciding to which of these lovely rivals the pre-eminence of beauty belongs. Our election is made. We admire them all, and have a garland of praise for each; but the object of our special choice is the elder of the sisterhood. The " Forget me not,'' as she has the rank of seniority, so is she our favourite in point of splendid embellishment and literary merit. "Who can look upon this accomplished little volume—who can turn over its silken pages, rich with all that genius can impart—without admiration of the rapid improvement in elegance and taste for which the present age is so conspicuous above every former one? Here the painter, the engraver, the poet, the poetess, the essayist, the novelist, the antiquarian, and (though last not least) the typographer,—display a combination of their utmost efforts to captivate the fancy, and to touch the heart. Through this efflorescent parterre the aged and the young, the eager swain and the timid nymph, the thoughtful and the gay, may wander with delight, meeting at every turn with new sources of fascination,—with sounds melting as those of the Orphean lyre, and scenes bright as those from Elysian bowers. The plates of this year's " Forget me not" are fourteen in number—all executed in the highest style of art, and by the most distinguished masters in the modern school. 1. " The Spanish Princess" drawn by Wilkie and engraved by Graves, presents a characteristic beauty of that ancient court of chivalry. The tender, and somewhat pensive eye, and the rich drapery of the dark flowing veil, are admirably given. 2. The vignette is an appropriate assemblage of devices, drawn by Burney and engraved by Chevalier, exhibiting the Sun emerging from behind the Globe, and in the foreground the emblems of the various talents employed in the production of the work the pallet, the easel, the standish, the roll, the lyre, and the garland. 4. "Place de Jeanne, d'Arc, Rouen," by Prout and Le Kenx : a rich plate, which Barry Cornwall, in the lines that follow it, makes the subject of just and well-expressed encomium. " Oh ! a brave painter art thou, Samuel Prout : By Jupiter ! I would not live without A drawing from thy pen, though I should feed Tomorrow with chamelons !" 5. " The Flower Girl of Savoy," by Gaugain and Robinson, is a fit companion to the beautiful anonymous verses which relate her story. " Now lifting up her deep blue eye, As if she long'd to wing that sky ; Now gazing where the sun's broad limb Seems on the shadowy lake to swim ; Now plunging in the valley bower, Herself the landscape's sweetest flower; To catch within her silken net The butterfly, all dewy wet, Then crop the rose and myrtle's bloom, Unmindful of the deepening gloom, Till the last gleam of dying day In twilight purple fades away." 5. " The Land Storm," by Clennell and Shenton—a terrifically faithful delineation of a winter tempest that has overtaken a military party, following the caravans with their baggage. The scene is in the Netherlands, and is connected with an interesting " Military Anecdote." 6. " The Exile," by Stephanoff and Portbury, is an interview between a gallant cavalier of 1660 and his "fair lady," who, with her sister, had been imprisoned within his paternal castle by the Usurper who then sat upon the English throne. The story resembles a fragment from Walter Scott, or still more from the author of "Brambletye House" and "The Tor Hill." The plate gives a lively representation of the costume and furniture of that memorable period. 7. " The Orphan Family," by Chisholme and Depenport, is a teaching illustration of an equally touching tale from the pen of Mrs. Hofland. 8. " The Tempting Moment," by Collins and Shenton, is a market scene ; an old apple-woman having indiscreetly dropped into a nap, a couple of young urchins are taking advantage of " The tempting moment," by filching her edible wares from the unprotected basket. The tale, consisting of " some passages in the life of Mr. Gilbert Ghrimes," by W. H. Harrison, Esq. concludes by sending its hero to " Botany Bay," where it is said " he arrived bankrupt in every thing but character, which he could not lose, inas much as he happened to be born without one." And it is added, in a tone of compliment for which we beg to return Mr. Harson the thanks it deserves,—"Nor indeed did he find the want of that commodity in Australia; the perfect state of public morals in the Colony doubtless being such, that to take a character thither would be to carry coals to Newsastle."9. " Undine" is a powerful, appalling night-scene, by Retzsch and Warren, attached to Spenserean stanzas from the pen of Mrs. Balmanno. 10. " Greenwich Hospital" is a perfect masterpiece, finished in the very highest style. The vessels, the froth-topped waves, the crowded quay, and the regal mansion itself, are executed with inimitable fidelity. The artists are Owen and Wallis. 11. " The Improvisatrice," by Bone and Romney, shows a lovely damsel, seated beneath a clustering vine, her lap-dog slumbering at her feet, her guitar by her side, her pretty chin resting on her pretty hand, as if, fatigued by a previous effort, she were rallying her sportive thoughts for a new sally into the realms of poesy. The stanzas are by Delta. 12. " Death of the Dove," by Stewardson and Finden. This is indeed a sweet sketch. A beautiful young girl is rescuing her darling dove from the rapacious eagle, who has already succeeded in mangling the milk white feathers of his innocent victim. The tender-hearted girl is pressing her favourite to her bosom, and casting a look of hatred and reproach upon the cruel destroyer, who, hovering near her, still seems determined to have his prey. 13. " The Shipwreck" is a frightful picture of a perishing ship tossed at random on the furious breakers. The distant glimmer of the light-house, and the moon peeping from behind a cloud of solid blackness, heighten the awful grandeur of the scene. Reinagle and Smart are the artists. 14. " The Ghaut," by Daniell and Finden, is the last in this delightful series. It is an oriental scene, illustrative of a " Sketch" by Miss Emma Roberts. We have so seriously trespassed upon our space in noticing these exquisite engravings, that we have left no room for an adequate review of the literary merits of the " Forget me Not." When we say that among the names of the contributors are those of Montgomery, Jeffrey, Byron, Barry Cornwall, Miss Mitford, Mrs. C. Baron Wilson, Mrs. Bowditch, Miss L. E. Landon, Henry Neele, and the Ettrick Shepherd, we at once give a pledge for the moral purity and intellectual excellence of its pages ; and we are sure that whoever shall purchase the work will consider themselves amply reimbursed." A RARE AND REMARKABLE SURVIVAL. Very good +. Item #911

Price: $1,950.00