Item #3677 MR. PICKENS' MOTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES RESPECTING THE MODE OF ELECTING ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT [December 20,1813. Committed to a comittee of the whole House on the state of the Union.]. Stated.
MR. PICKENS' MOTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES RESPECTING THE MODE OF ELECTING ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT [December 20,1813. Committed to a comittee of the whole House on the state of the Union.]
MR. PICKENS' MOTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES RESPECTING THE MODE OF ELECTING ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT [December 20,1813. Committed to a comittee of the whole House on the state of the Union.]

MR. PICKENS' MOTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES RESPECTING THE MODE OF ELECTING ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT [December 20,1813. Committed to a comittee of the whole House on the state of the Union.]

Washington City: [Printed By Roger C. Weightman], 1813. First Edition, First Printing. [No Binding. A Very Good copy of the above-title in the Publisher's original paper, being a motion to amend the Constitutional method to elect Electors to choose determine the then-coming President and Vice President of the United States of America. The Proposal passed in both the House of Representatives and the Senate but failed to be approved by a sufficient number of the individual States to take effect. [Shaw & Shoemaker, 30303.] Item #3160 There have been only 27 Amendments to the Constitution made, beginning with the Bill of Rights (the first 10 Amendments. According to Article V of the Constitution, an amendment must either be proposed by Congress with a two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, or by a constitutional convention called for by two-thirds of state legislatures. Either way, a proposed amendment only becomes part of the Constitution when ratified by legislatures or conventions in three-fourths of the states (presently 38 of the 50 states).

Since the Constitution was ratified in 1789, hundreds of thousands of bills have been introduced attempting to amend it. But only 27 amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been ratified, out of 33 passed by Congress and sent to the states. Under Article V, states also have the option of petitioning Congress to call a constitutional convention if two-thirds of state legislatures agree to do so. This has never occurred, though state legislatures have passed hundreds of resolutions over the years calling for a constitutional convention over issues ranging from a balanced budget to campaign finance reform.

In order to secure support for the Constitution among Anti-Federalists, who feared it gave too much power to the national government at the expense of individual states, James Madison agreed to draft a Bill of Rights during the first session of Congress. Of these first 10 amendments, the First Amendment is arguably the most famous and most important. It states that Congress can pass no law that encroaches on an American freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to assemble and freedom to petition the government. These fundamental rights of thought and expression go to the heart of the revolutionary idea of popular government, as envisioned in the Declaration of Independence.


In total, there are 538 electoral votes. In order to be elected President, the candidate must receive 270 of the electoral votes (or a majority).

There was a reason the Founding Fathers created the Electoral College. While it might seem unnecessary or complicated, it ensures that every state has a meaningful voice in the electoral process.

PRESENTLY: Voters in all but two States (Nebraska and Maine) each state choose electors by casting a vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. The slate winning the most popular votes is the winner. In Nebraska and Maine electoral votes are proportionally allocated. Very good. Item #3677

Price: $750.00

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